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Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
our children and future generations. some may still deny the overwhelming judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging firesser and crippling drought and more powerful storms. >> michael: but will policy follow words this time? will mitigating the effects of climate change be a hallmark of president obama's second term? he did say climate change. joining me now to discuss the progressives reaction to president obama's speech is donny fowler, uea graduate. he runs his own political firm here. donny as always great to have you back inside "the war room." before we get into the nitty-gritty, what did you think of the president's speech. >> it was great. president obama has learned a lot of lessons about being in washington, d.c. you have to stand up, say what you want and fight hard for it. you can't sit back and wait for them to come to you. >> michael: i hear and i agree. i thought it was fantastic speech. >> it wasn't a liberal speech. we'll tax any estates over $1 million. we're going to put a carbon tax on any carbon. we're going to legalized drug
to "science bob" pflugfelder. again, go to his website, sciencebob.com. we apologize to mad damon, we did run out of time for him. "nightline" is next. free chips for everyone. thanks for watching. good night. >>> tonight on "nightline," an american icon's shattering confession. lance armstrong coming clean about the lies that could cost his reputation, millions, and his live strong empire. >>> heartbreak or hoax? the tragic romance that never was. the curious case of a college football star and his fake online girlfriend. tonight, was he duped or did he know? >>> and a dramatic rescue mission for american hostages held by terrorists in north africa. we have the latest as some of the missing make their way home. >>> from new york city, this is "nightline" with bill weir. >> good evening, thanks for staying up late with us tonight. well, a cancer survivor wins the most grueling race in the world seven times clean. it's the kind of story we want to believe in, right? well, tonight brought confirmation from lance armstrong that on the contrary, he was really a cheating, lying bully who spent yea
have got even very good at the science of this. it's not perfect, and i think one of the reasons that this is coming out is because it's obvious that it's not perfect, but it's good enough to catch people. lance armstrong has been caught. jenna: a quick follow-up to this, since you were working with this agency since 1999, did you have any indication, i mean did you feel like you had information that was for sure that he was doing this. and just couldn't peg it on him? what was it like inside the agency? well, we really don't get involved in our committee as to the various case ed casess that are being prosecuted. we are more involved with what constitutes a doping offense. a doping offense does not necessarily mean a positive drug terbgs it can be other violations of the process with the same sanctions. jenna: a quick final question to the doctor then i want you to weigh into this as well. based on what you no about the races and what kind of substances might be used, how many people would it take to elude these types of tests. >> it's a rather complex business. it's sophisticat
science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. . >>> our second story "outfront," breakingous. cnn has learned that one american has been killed in the algeria hostage situation. i want to get straight to jill dougherty at the state department. jill, what can you tell us about this man who has lost his life? >> erin, the latest information we're getting is the name of that american who did die. it's coming in a statement from victoria nuland who is the spokesperson for the state department. she said that his name was fredrick butaccio and he died in that hostage situation. the state department is expressing its deepest condolences to the family and also the friends of fredrick. but they're not giving any details and that is one thing that has plagued it's information coming out of algeria ever since this began. we do know from a u.s. official that six americans, however, were freed or escaped, and others still are unaccounted for. earlier friday victoria nuland also said that some americans are being held hostage. so the bottom line here is that of it continues to be an operation w
science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> our third story "outfront," is the nra unbeatable. the powerful gun lobbying group has seen its membership grow by more than 250,000 in the past month and this is even more stunning. it added more than 30,000 new members on the day of the president's press conference. 30,000 people in one day. while president obama has made gun control a priority in this term, he's still struggling to get the american people on his side. the latest cnn poll show that is 49% of americans disapprove of how the president has handled gun control and that's even after this ad which was criticized by democrats and republicans alike. >> are the president's kids more important than yours? then why is he skeptical about putting armed security in our schools when his kids are protected by armed guards at their school? >> is the nra winning the gun debate even in spite of an ad like that? "outfront" continue aaron blake a political reporter for "the washington post" who wrote about this topic today and cnn contributors reihan salam and roland martin. you gave t
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> well, for many around the country it's a long weekend and the president did have to share the spotlight with dr. martin luther king, jr. just before the president's formal swearing in this morning, he and the first family together attended a church service which celebrated king and his legacy, and tomorrow's public swearing in, of course, coincides with the national holiday honoring the slain civil rights leader. now, when the president takes the oeath of office, he's going to use a bible that belonged to dr. king. the president and vice president joe biden honored the nation's fallen soldiers today as well during a wreath laying ceremony at arlington national cemetery. it took place shortly after the vice president was sworn in. >> this is the president aes day and the president's moment in the spotlight but when the ceremony is done, all the parties, mr. obama will still have to deal with the republican led house of representatives, divided gove
, a special report, the psychology and science behind cheating. join brooke baldwin right here on cnn. >>> the overall death right from cancer in the united states has dropped 20% from more than 20 years ago. this new report coming from the american cancer society. that means nearly 1.2 million cancer deaths have been prevented in that time. the report also projects there will be 1.6 million new cancer cases this year. but overall cancer cases are declining for most types of cancer. what does this all mean? with me now is chief medical officer and executive vice president of the american cancer society. welcome, doctor. >> hello. how are you? >> so these figures, they are just released this morning and you must be feeling good. >> this is really good news. you can look at survival by the number of people getting cancer a you can see, since survival is increasing we must be doing something well but you can also debate that. nobody can debate it when the number of people dying is actually going down. 1.2 million people alive today that wouldn't have gotten cancer. >> what type of cancer
last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. jon: new details on a bizarre kidnapping of a five-year-old girl take friend her school in philadelphia earlier this week. police are searching for a machine and woman involved in the kidnapping. the little girl was found safe we are happy to report. rick folbaum has more for us now. >> reporter: this ordeal for the young girl began monday morning not long after the start of the school day. a woman wearing muslim garb came to her school, said she was the 5-year-old's mother and said she was taking the girl out for breakfast. none of it was true, but it was enough to convince the staff to let her go with her. instead of going to breakfast the girl was in fact kidnapped, taken to a house. she was told to remove her clothes, she was tied up and blindfold eld with the help of other person, a man. here is the local police captain. >> we do know he was inside the residence and joined his female abductor in restraining this child through the night until the next day. this little girl suffered, you know, cond
by the academy of sciences questions from the federal government's food stamp program provide adequate healthy diets for the more than 46 million people on the program. my next guest says this that budget of approximately $120 per week is plenty of money to be the family of four if people knew how to shop smart. joining me now, stephanie nelson, the founder of coupon mom. author of the new york times best selling book. good to have you here. >> they cue for having me. lou: you have some groceries assembled here, and it all looks very good. $120 a week for a family of four is reasonable. >> i do. in fact a $120 per week for a family of four is the average. 41 percent actually did $668 per month for a family of four. the average is 125. a significant percentage are getting more than certainly enough to feed a family and help the night. lou: explain to us. this looks like a very healthy food to me. i'm sure that my wife, as i said that, is saying forget about the testing goes. i love them. >> this is just an example. the planning meals around what is on sale in the grocery store and combine sales
:00 eastern we will examine precisely that. why we cheat, the psychology and science behind cheating. we're all over it. don't miss it tomorrow. that's it for me here m i'm brooke baldwin in atlanta. now we go to washington to wolf blitzer. "the situation room" begins now. >>> brooke, thanks very much. happening now, breaking news. americans held hostage in a deadly terrorist attack in algeria. we'll have the latest. >>> also, the president of the nra is here in "the situation room." we're getting his reaction to the sweeping proposals against gun violence. and the presidential inauguration only five days away. we'll take you inside the law enforcement command center working to keep him safe. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> this is cnn breaking news. >> let's get to the breaking news. a deadly terrorist attack on a gas field in eastern algeria near the libyan border. some of the more than 40 hostages seized have been released but a number of them are still being held, including americans. the state department confirms those americans are affiliated with the oil gian
that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: algeria's state news agency now says special forces have completed a mission to rescue dozens of foreign hostages, including some americans. they'd been held by militants tied to al-qaeda. but there are wildly varying accounts of how many got out alive, and how many were killed. >> because of the fluidity and the fact that there is a lot of planning going on, i cannot give you any further details at this time about the current situation on the ground. >> brown: even this afternoon, as secretary of state hillary clinton suggested, the situation in algeria remained confused. the focus was this natural gas compound in the sahara desert seen here in footage from last month. the vast, natu
poison at "lunch in the lab." plus, tell us what you think of our science coverage. take our poll, which you can find at the bottom of the story. "need to know" on pbs tonight takes a look at our nation's aging infrastructure and its impact on our economy. it's part one of two editions funded by the supporters of the nonprofit, nonpartisan advocacy group common good. jeff greenfield reports how the sluggish pace of change threatens our future. >> . >> on may 29th, 1935, two years after they had begun pouring, crews placed the last concrete in hoover dam. this modern civil engineering wonder stood completed, two and one half years ahead of schedule. >> it was the most ambitious public works project in human history. built in the depths of the great depression. to tame the colorado river, created an immense man-made lake, provided the electric power to the california defense plants that helped win world war 12. hoover dam is one of countless examples of the kind of public works that defined america. from the erie canal to the transcontinental railroad, to the interstate highway system. suc
judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms. >> and here is what the american people think about that. our brand-new cnn/orc poll shows 49% of the nation thinks that it is a manmade problem. you can see that just 23% say it's not a proven fact at all. i want to bring in our white house correspondent, dan lothian. there were a lot of things touched on in this speech, but the mention of global warming, did that seem to catch people by surprise? >> reporter: i think so. i mean, we've not heard a lot of conversation here in washington about climate change. i looked back just a few days ago i was putting together a piece for cnn.com and i was writing about the president's priorities over the next four years. at the end of that piece i tucked in a line about climate change. i remember thinking, it's been a while since i've heard about this. i have to go back to the first year of the president's first term where he tried to make some movement on climate change and then caught up in the economic crisis that got
betray our children and future generations. some may still deny the overwhelming judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms. >> before leaving the capitol, president obama pauses to absorb the moment. >> take a look one more time. i'm not going to see this again. >> what about women's rights? on today's 40th abc anniversary of roe v. wade our exclusive nbc news-wall street journal polls shows for the first time a majority of americans say abortion should be legal in almost all cases. candid camera. the girls snap pictures. they dance. they laugh it up during the parade. >>> nbc's al roker scores a thumbs up from president obama. and gets a running handshake from vice president biden. >> mr. president, how is it going? >> great. >> mr. vice president, hey, how are you doing? come on. come -- come on. >> oh, yeah! yes! yes! >> and lady in red. >> ladies and gentlemen, my better half and my dance partner, michelle obama. >> first lady michelle obama dazzles in a jason wu gown at the inaugural balls. >>> w
of our science coverage. take our poll, which you can find at the bottom of the story. "need to know" on pbs tonight takes a look at our nation's aging infrastructure and its impact on our economy. it's part one of two editions funded by the supporters of the nonprofit, nonpartisan advocacy group common good. jeff greenfield reports how the sluggish pace of change threatens our future. >> . >> on may 29th 1935 two years after they had begun pouring, crews placed the last concrete in hoover dam. this modern civil engineering wonder stood completed, two and one half years ahead of schedule. >> it was the most ambitious public works project in human history. built in the depths of the great depression. to tame the colorado river created an immense man-made lake, provided the electric power to the california defense plants that helped win world war 12. hoover dam is one of countless examples of the kind of public works that defined america. from the erie canal to the transcontinental railroad to the interstate highway system. such project its sim-- symbolized the nation's ambition and en
. >> is there something intrinsic to the science of lithium ion batteries that make them more prone to these kinds of catastrophic failures? >> absolutely. they are very small and very powerful. even the big batteries are a bunch of small batteries put together. if you get damage or defect, they put up a lot of energy quickly. >> is it smart to use them in something as complex and potentially life-impacting as an airplane? >> they are already used in lot of airplanes. including joint strike fighter. in some of the new airbus planes. they are in the chevy volt. they are kind of everywhere. so i don't think you will see a retreat from the batteries. what you will see is efforts to make them safer. >> how do you mitigate the risk? >> there is very sophisticated systems that monitor voltage, to keep wires from short circuiting. when they do flame up, you want it control the fires immediately. there is a lot of different ways dhe go at this problem. >> craig, thank you very much. we hope to be back with you soon as we follow this story. we appreciate you being here. >> my pleasure. >> united technologi
is also a science. >> reporter: welcome to the good life at google. this campus in mountainview california offers employees comfort, privileges and perks that workers at most other companies can only envy. but what may seem like luxuries are actually good business, and google can prove that because the company studies everything it does. >> we try to bring as much analytics and data and science to what we do on the people side as our engineer do on the product side. >> reporter: lazlo bok heads the operations department. google's data mining gives detailed notion what pays off. >> when an employee starts on the first day, we have data that says if the manager shows up and says, "hi, nice to meet you, you're on my team we're going to be working together," those people end up 15% more productive in nine months. >> google will be an -- >> reporter: to make sure the rest of the googleler's career remains productive is david radford's responsibility. >> we thought it would be a great idea to build a building that allowed us to try new things and find out what w
of fascism or communism with muskets or militias. no single person can train the math and science teachers we'll need to equip our children for the future. or build the roads and networks and research labs that will bring new jobs and businesses to our shores. now, more than ever, we must do these things together, as one nation and one people. [ cheers and applause ] >> this generation of americans has been tested by crises that steeled our resolve and proved our resilience. a decade of war is now ending. [ applause ] >> an economic recovery has begun. america's possibilities are limitless, for we possess all the qualities that this world without boundaries demands. youth and drive, diversity and openness. an endless capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention. my fellow americans, we are made for this moment, and we will seize it so long as we seize it together! [ applause ] >> for we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. [ applause ] >> we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad should
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> lance armstrong's doping confession is the latest in a very, very long line of scandals. and there's a primetime series of the same name about managing these kinds of public relations crises. >> i have enough to arrest her right here, right now. >> you could. but being an upholder of the constitution, you'd need an arrest warrant, wouldn't you? do you have one of those? my white hat is bigger than your white hat. >> judy smith was the person, the inspiration for that very show, a very popular show. she's ceo and president of smith & company, a crisis communications firm. >> judy, thanks very much for coming in. here's the question -- lance armstrong were your client, how would you grade the interview with oprah? >> that's a tough one, wolf. i think i would probably give him a "c" or a "d." the reason why i say that, admitting that he doped is a good first step. the issue is that the interview, quite frankly, generated more skepticism than s
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> let's get a little bit more on the alleged hoax and the mystery surrounding the notre dame football star, manti te'o. >> the university says he's the victim of an online phenomenon in which someone creates a fake social media profile. listen. >> i would refer all of you, if you're not already familiar with it, with both the documentary called "catfish," the mtv show, which is a derivative of that documentary, and the sort of associated things you'll find online and otherwise about catfish or catfishing. >> all right. let's get some more right now with the executive producer of mtv's "catfish," ariel schulman is joining us. ariel, thanks very much for coming in. first of all, explain to our viewers what catfishing is, what "catfish" is all about, how you got this name. >> i mean, it's amazing to me that it's becoming such a used term at this point. it didn't mean anything before the documentary. there's a character who uses it in reference to an old parable about cod fish being transported
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)